Bath

We had visited Bath on an earlier trip, but Sheila wanted to see the Fashion Museum housed in the basement of the elegant Assembly Rooms (built as a venue for balls, concerts, and gambling and the hub of fashionable Georgian society).  Despite patches of blue sky, it was cold (anoraks and gloves) as we walked past the Royal Crescent and Circus to the Assembly Rooms and the warmth of the museum was welcome. I found the museum surprisingly engaging but my interest faded earlier than Sheila’s and I set out to reacquaint myself with the streets of Bath. Bath has been a spa since the Romans built baths and a temple around 60 AD, a Christian religious centre since the 7th Century with the construction of the Bath Abbey (the current abbey is largely the result of Elizabethan reconstruction after the dissolution), and became a popular destination of the upper class for its curative waters in the 18th century. The city is dominated by primarily Georgian architecture with curving, uniform, symmetrical façades built largely as residential and rental apartments for the increasing number of visitors in the 17-18 hundreds. The shop-lined Pulteney Bridge crossing the Avon River above the graceful, 3-stepped parabolic weir is, along with the Ponte Vecchio and Rialto Bridge, one of the few surviving bridge/shopping arcades in Europe. A popular tourist destination for its Roman Baths and Georgian Architecture, Bath also boasts a vibrant international arts scene and numerous museums and galleries.
A Sense of Place:  Travel, Photography, and Photo-art
by David E. Moon
© David E. Moon, 2014  All rights reserved
Slideshow Slideshow

Bath

We had visited Bath on an earlier trip, but Sheila wanted to see the Fashion Museum housed in the basement of the elegant Assembly Rooms (built as a venue for balls, concerts, and gambling and the hub of fashionable Georgian society).  Despite patches of blue sky, it was cold (anoraks and gloves) as we walked past the Royal Crescent and Circus to the Assembly Rooms and the warmth of the museum was welcome. I found the museum surprisingly engaging but my interest faded earlier than Sheila’s and I set out to reacquaint myself with the streets of Bath. Bath has been a spa since the Romans built baths and a temple around 60 AD, a Christian religious centre since the 7th Century with the construction of the Bath Abbey (the current abbey is largely the result of Elizabethan reconstruction after the dissolution), and became a popular destination of the upper class for its curative waters in the 18th century. The city is dominated by primarily Georgian architecture with curving, uniform, symmetrical façades built largely as residential and rental apartments for the increasing number of visitors in the 17-18 hundreds. The shop-lined Pulteney Bridge crossing the Avon River above the graceful, 3-stepped parabolic weir is, along with the Ponte Vecchio and Rialto Bridge, one of the few surviving bridge/shopping arcades in Europe. A popular tourist destination for its Roman Baths and Georgian Architecture, Bath also boasts a vibrant international arts scene and numerous museums and galleries.
A Sense of Place:  Travel, Photography, and Photo-art
© David E. Moon, 2014  All rights reserved
Slideshow Slideshow