Birmingham A market town in medieval times, Birmingham rose to prominence during the industrial revolution and has been a leading artistic, intellectual, scientific, and technology leader and was pivotal in the industrial revolution. My image of Birmingham as the bleak heart of the industrial Midlands was shattered when we visited. Heavily damaged during the German Blitz, reconstruction and a policy of urban renewal since the WWII have created a surprisingly clean, modern city. We arrived by train from Droitwich Spa and from the platform were immediately confronted by the mirrored Selfridges Department Store in the massive Bullring and Grand Central Shopping complex. To our surprise, and despite being the second largest city in the UK, the city had closed all of its tourist information locations and the local hop-on hop-off tourist service had been cancelled. Even so, and despite much construction obstruction and armed guards at control points on the New Street pedestrian mall, we managed to find our way about and thoroughly enjoyed our exploration. We shared a poignant moment with the citizens of Birmingham on June 14 when Grand Central went silent as the nation observed a 2-minute silence commemorating the 1-year anniversary of 72 deaths resulting from the Grenfell Tower Fire in London.
A Sense of Place:  Travel, Photography, and Photo-art
by David E. Moon
© David E. Moon, 2018  All rights reserved
Slideshow Slideshow
Birmingham A market town in medieval times, Birmingham rose to prominence during the industrial revolution and has been a leading artistic, intellectual, scientific, and technology leader and was pivotal in the industrial revolution. My image of Birmingham as the bleak heart of the industrial Midlands was shattered when we visited. Heavily damaged during the German Blitz, reconstruction and a policy of urban renewal since the WWII have created a surprisingly clean, modern city. We arrived by train from Droitwich Spa and from the platform were immediately confronted by the mirrored Selfridges Department Store in the massive Bullring and Grand Central Shopping complex. To our surprise, and despite being the second largest city in the UK, the city had closed all of its tourist information locations and the local hop-on hop-off tourist service had been cancelled. Even so, and despite much construction obstruction and armed guards at control points on the New Street pedestrian mall, we managed to find our way about and thoroughly enjoyed our exploration. We shared a poignant moment with the citizens of Birmingham on June 14 when Grand Central went silent as the nation observed a 2-minute silence commemorating the 1-year anniversary of 72 deaths resulting from the Grenfell Tower Fire in London.
A Sense of Place:  Travel, Photography, and Photo-art
© David E. Moon, 2014  All rights reserved
Slideshow Slideshow