The Campdens Chipping Campden (chipping from the Old English cēping, a market) is a small market town in the Cotswolds. Its lovely terraced high street, dating from the 14th century, is lined with elegant shops and homes, its 15th century market hall and having coffee and cake at a small pastry shop were both highlights of our visit. A pleasant walk along quiet streets and public footpaths led to Broad Campden, a lovely, immaculately manicured village of honey coloured Cotswold stone roofed in thatch and slate. The idyllic peace and quiet disturbed only once as a local farmer speeding on his large tractor nearly collided with a local bus, the roar of his engine replaced by the squeal of rubber on the road as a cloud of blue smoke briefly enveloped them on the narrow lane. Our attempt to return via a different route was aborted because of wet ground and bramble covered paths, but we found our way back to the original footpath and returned to Chipping Campden to continue our exploration. Old Campden House was destroyed during the civil war but the banqueting hall and some outbuildings remain. St James church evolved from a simple squat tower and nave in the 10th century to its present imposing early perpendicular style by the 14th century. The extravagant 17th century marble monuments in the church and the almshouse were thanks to Sir Baptist Hicks who required residents of his almshouse to wear uniforms displaying his family crest, behave decorously, and not marry on penalty of expulsion.
A Sense of Place:  Travel, Photography, and Photo-art
by David E. Moon
© David E. Moon, 2018  All rights reserved
Slideshow Slideshow
The Campdens Chipping Campden (chipping from the Old English cēping, a market) is a small market town in the Cotswolds. Its lovely terraced high street, dating from the 14th century, is lined with elegant shops and homes, its 15th century market hall and having coffee and cake at a small pastry shop were both highlights of our visit. A pleasant walk along quiet streets and public footpaths led to Broad Campden, a lovely, immaculately manicured village of honey coloured Cotswold stone roofed in thatch and slate. The idyllic peace and quiet disturbed only once as a local farmer speeding on his large tractor nearly collided with a local bus, the roar of his engine replaced by the squeal of rubber on the road as a cloud of blue smoke briefly enveloped them on the narrow lane. Our attempt to return via a different route was aborted because of wet ground and bramble covered paths, but we found our way back to the original footpath and returned to Chipping Campden to continue our exploration. Old Campden House was destroyed during the civil war but the banqueting hall and some outbuildings remain. St James church evolved from a simple squat tower and nave in the 10th  century to its present imposing early perpendicular style by the 14th century. The extravagant 17th century marble monuments in the church and the almshouse were thanks to Sir Baptist Hicks who required residents of his almshouse to wear uniforms displaying his family crest, behave decorously, and not marry on penalty of expulsion.
A Sense of Place:  Travel, Photography, and Photo-art
© David E. Moon, 2014  All rights reserved
Slideshow Slideshow