Glastonbury

Feeling nostalgic for the 1970s, we headed off to Glastonbury. Home to myth and legend and the site of a powerful monastery from the 600s to 1539 (its last abbot was hanged, drawn, and quartered on Glastonbury Tor as a traitor by Henry VIII), it is now a centre of “New Age“spiritualism, mysticism, neo-paganism, spiritual retreat, commercial tourism, and a popular venue for festivals. The Tor, rising 158 m above surrounding reclaimed fens, dominates the landscape and provides an obvious physical and spiritual focus for the area As we walked the streets, I did indeed feel transported back to the 1970s, members of counter cultures, identifiable by hair and dress style, mingled with tourists and more conservative locals. Youths dressed from street to hippie played bongos, rode skate boards and scooters, busked, or just hung out. Shops catered to mystics, spiritualists, fantasy and Goth fans, and tourists alike, as well as to normal everyday needs such as food and drink. The eclectic mix of medieval to Victorian and modern architecture (tourist information is housed in a 15th-century medieval merchant’s house and a 19th-century octagonal market cross landmarks town centre) all add to the off-beat ambiance of the town. We experienced no spiritual or mystic epiphany, but after a climb to St Michael’s tower atop the Tor and exploration of Glastonbury’s streets, sitting in the sun beside the market cross, relaxing over coffee and cake, and watching the passers-by was more than adequate compensation for our exertions.
A Sense of Place:  Travel, Photography, and Photo-art
by David E. Moon
© David E. Moon, 2014  All rights reserved
Slideshow Slideshow

Glastonbury

Feeling nostalgic for the 1970s, we headed off to Glastonbury. Home to myth and legend and the site of a powerful monastery from the 600s to 1539 (its last abbot was hanged, drawn, and quartered on Glastonbury Tor as a traitor by Henry VIII), it is now a centre of “New Age“spiritualism, mysticism, neo-paganism, spiritual retreat, commercial tourism, and a popular venue for festivals. The Tor, rising 158 m above surrounding reclaimed fens, dominates the landscape and provides an obvious physical and spiritual focus for the area As we walked the streets, I did indeed feel transported back to the 1970s, members of counter cultures, identifiable by hair and dress style, mingled with tourists and more conservative locals. Youths dressed from street to hippie played bongos, rode skate boards and scooters, busked, or just hung out. Shops catered to mystics, spiritualists, fantasy and Goth fans, and tourists alike, as well as to normal everyday needs such as food and drink. The eclectic mix of medieval to Victorian and modern architecture (tourist information is housed in a 15th-century medieval merchant’s house and a 19th-century octagonal market cross landmarks town centre) all add to the off-beat ambiance of the town. We experienced no spiritual or mystic epiphany, but after a climb to St Michael’s tower atop the Tor and exploration of Glastonbury’s streets, sitting in the sun beside the market cross, relaxing over coffee and cake, and watching the passers-by was more than adequate compensation for our exertions.
A Sense of Place:  Travel, Photography, and Photo-art
© David E. Moon, 2014  All rights reserved
Slideshow Slideshow