A Walk About Marlborough

Marlborough is a market town set along the old London to Bath road. A nearby tumulus indicates occupation of the area from at least 2400 BC, there are remains of Roman occupation, William the Conqueror took control of Marlborough from the Saxons in 1067, and in 1204 King John established the weekly markets (Wednesdays and Saturdays) that continue to this day. There is nothing precious or pretentious about this town, it is a down-to-earth market town. Repeated fires in the 17th century destroyed most buildings and led to an Act of Parliament prohibiting the use of thatch in the town of Marlborough. Its rebuilding allowed the widening of the high street, and it boasts the second-widest high street in Britain. This means that, except on market days, it is a large parking lot with traffic flowing either side of a rank of cars in the middle and between ranks of cars on either side. While it boasts nearly 300 listed structures, none are category 1 and only a few are of more than special interest. The Wednesday market was a little sparse and sandwiched between parked cars, but offered local produce, assorted housewares, clothing, local crafts, and the usual junk. Perhaps it was the lack of tourists and tourist attractions, perhaps it is just that we are blue-collar at heart, but this straight forward market town, with interesting shops, good pubs and restaurants, and pleasant walks was a delight.
A Sense of Place:  Travel, Photography, and Photo-art
by David E. Moon
© David E. Moon, 2014  All rights reserved
Slideshow Slideshow

A Walk About Marlborough

Marlborough is a market town set along the old London to Bath road. A nearby tumulus indicates occupation of the area from at least 2400 BC, there are remains of Roman occupation, William the Conqueror took control of Marlborough from the Saxons in 1067, and in 1204 King John established the weekly markets (Wednesdays and Saturdays) that continue to this day. There is nothing precious or pretentious about this town, it is a down-to-earth market town. Repeated fires in the 17th century destroyed most buildings and led to an Act of Parliament prohibiting the use of thatch in the town of Marlborough. Its rebuilding allowed the widening of the high street, and it boasts the second-widest high street in Britain. This means that, except on market days, it is a large parking lot with traffic flowing either side of a rank of cars in the middle and between ranks of cars on either side. While it boasts nearly 300 listed structures, none are category 1 and only a few are of more than special interest. The Wednesday market was a little sparse and sandwiched between parked cars, but offered local produce, assorted housewares, clothing, local crafts, and the usual junk. Perhaps it was the lack of tourists and tourist attractions, perhaps it is just that we are blue-collar at heart, but this straight forward market town, with interesting shops, good pubs and restaurants, and pleasant walks was a delight.
A Sense of Place:  Travel, Photography, and Photo-art
© David E. Moon, 2014  All rights reserved
Slideshow Slideshow