Messums Wiltshire Gallery

Despite the rain, it was a pleasant and quite lovely drive to the Messums Wiltshire gallery and grounds at Tisbury. I did not have any expectations, other than that it had been recommended by our first cottage host. We stopped to explore the exquisite but redundant little church of Berwick, St. Leonard (see Redundant Churches in the contents) on the way. Messums Wiltshire was one of those unexpected delights that make travels memorable. First we were met by a herd of sheep (mothers and lambs) at the parking lot. Turning around we were greeted by a giant, bronze, disembodied horse head grazing in the manicured field next to a 13th-century tithe barn. Horse and barn were incongruously separated by a bright, almost gaudy ceramic installation reminiscent of a Hindu temple in its glossy,  vibrant colours. A painted bronze of an oversize seated man, unnervingly realistic, sat with his back to Messums, contemplating the village of Tisbury and the valley beyond. Life-size bronze figures and stylized animals stood around the tithe barn and in a courtyard between  the Long Gallery (a restored dairy), the tithe barn, and workshops and studios. The Long Gallery, with its panoramic sweep of glass window looking onto the pastured hills of the Fonthill estate, its modern, clean, stark-white interior was a perfect venue for the exhibition of pottery evocative of the primitive and modern with an overtone of post-apocalyptic times (my interpretation) by Joanna Still and the intriguingly subtle etchings of Tim Harrison. Impressed as I was with the Long Gallery, I was unprepared for the exhibition of stone objects also by Tim Harrison. Sculpted to feature the beauty and character of the stone, the massive, open space of  tithe barn allowed sufficient separation to view the individual exhibits unobstructed and yet provided context from the exhibition as a whole. The medieval hand-hewn beams and stones of the tithe barn enhanced the clean, modern lines of the sculptures and left me feeling just a little awed.
A Sense of Place:  Travel, Photography, and Photo-art
by David E. Moon
© David E. Moon, 2014  All rights reserved
Slideshow Slideshow

Messums Wiltshire Gallery

Despite the rain, it was a pleasant and quite lovely drive to the Messums Wiltshire gallery and grounds at Tisbury. I did not have any expectations, other than that it had been recommended by our first cottage host. We stopped to explore the exquisite but redundant little church of Berwick, St. Leonard (see Redundant Churches in the contents) on the way. Messums Wiltshire was one of those unexpected delights that make travels memorable. First we were met by a herd of sheep (mothers and lambs) at the parking lot. Turning around we were greeted by a giant, bronze, disembodied horse head grazing in the manicured field next to a 13th- century tithe barn. Horse and barn were incongruously separated by a bright, almost gaudy ceramic installation reminiscent of a Hindu temple in its glossy,  vibrant colours. A painted bronze of an oversize seated man, unnervingly realistic, sat with his back to Messums, contemplating the village of Tisbury and the valley beyond. Life-size bronze figures and stylized animals stood around the tithe barn and in a courtyard between  the Long Gallery (a restored dairy), the tithe barn, and workshops and studios. The Long Gallery, with its panoramic sweep of glass window looking onto the pastured hills of the Fonthill estate, its modern, clean, stark-white interior was a perfect venue for the exhibition of pottery evocative of the primitive and modern with an overtone of post-apocalyptic times (my interpretation) by Joanna Still and the intriguingly subtle etchings of Tim Harrison. Impressed as I was with the Long Gallery, I was unprepared for the exhibition of stone objects also by Tim Harrison. Sculpted to feature the beauty and character of the stone, the massive, open space of  tithe barn allowed sufficient separation to view the individual exhibits unobstructed and yet provided context from the exhibition as a whole. The medieval hand-hewn beams and stones of the tithe barn enhanced the clean, modern lines of the sculptures and left me feeling just a little awed.
A Sense of Place:  Travel, Photography, and Photo-art
© David E. Moon, 2014  All rights reserved
Slideshow Slideshow