Painswick “Queen of the Cotswolds”

Painswick, self-styled “Queen of the Cotswolds” overlooks another of the 5 valleys between Stroud and Cloucester. Its narrow streets and architecture have a quaint English charm. New Street was built in 1428 at the height of the medieval wool trade, its oldest extant building, built in 1478, is reputed to be oldest building having housed a post office in Britain. We had spent 4 hours exploring the adjacent Slad Valley on foot and were a little footsore as we approached town from Painswick Valley, climbing along Stamage’s lane bounded by homes built of mellow Cotswold stone. It seemed a lovely, quiet, little town, its back streets were nearly devoid of traffic, and most of its shops were closed for the day. We parked and walked a little further up the hill to New Street only to discover bumper to bumper traffic creeping through town. The A46 connecting Stroud and Cheltenham funnels traffic through this 540-year old street, a street designed for carts and wagons, not modern SUVs and transport trucks. We retreated to Friday Street, a quiet, one lane passage where we found Olivas Delicatessen and relaxed over coffee and cake before setting off to explore the quiet back streets and the church of St Mary. Best known for its 99 ancient Yew trees, chest tombs, and imposing wool church, the highlight for me was  the children using toppled headstones as launching pads in their attempts to fly.
A Sense of Place:  Travel, Photography, and Photo-art
by David E. Moon
© David E. Moon, 2014  All rights reserved
Slideshow Slideshow

Painswick “Queen of the Cotswolds”

Painswick, self-styled “Queen of the Cotswolds” overlooks another of the 5 valleys between Stroud and Cloucester. Its narrow streets and architecture have a quaint English charm. New Street was built in 1428 at the height of the medieval wool trade, its oldest extant building, built in 1478, is reputed to be oldest building having housed a post office in Britain. We had spent 4 hours exploring the adjacent Slad Valley on foot and were a little footsore as we approached town from Painswick Valley, climbing along Stamage’s lane bounded by homes built of mellow Cotswold stone. It seemed a lovely, quiet, little town, its back streets were nearly devoid of traffic, and most of its shops were closed for the day. We parked and walked a little further up the hill to New Street only to discover bumper to bumper traffic creeping through town. The A46 connecting Stroud and Cheltenham funnels traffic through this 540-year old street, a street designed for carts and wagons, not modern SUVs and transport trucks. We retreated to Friday Street, a quiet, one lane passage where we found Olivas Delicatessen and relaxed over coffee and cake before setting off to explore the quiet back streets and the church of St Mary. Best known for its 99 ancient Yew trees, chest tombs, and imposing wool church, the highlight for me was  the children using toppled headstones as launching pads in their attempts to fly.
A Sense of Place:  Travel, Photography, and Photo-art
© David E. Moon, 2014  All rights reserved
Slideshow Slideshow