Sarsens and Bluebells

We often hear about Sarsen stones: they are the large standing stones and lintels forming the ring of giant stones at Stonehenge, they are the standing stones of Avebury, and they form the structure of many neolithic- and bronze-age barrows. They are scattered across the landscapes of the Salisbury Plain, the Wiltshire downs, and elsewhere, and are the remnants of a silica-cemented sandstone cap that once covered much of southern England. Why Sarsen? It is a shortening of Saracen, a common name for Muslims and commonly applied to anything non-Christian in the Wiltshire dialect. All this to say that we walked among natural sarsen stones lying in situ at the National Trust Conservation Area, Lockeridge Dene before heading off into the West Woods and a spectacular display of bluebells.
A Sense of Place:  Travel, Photography, and Photo-art
by David E. Moon
© David E. Moon, 2014  All rights reserved
Slideshow Slideshow

Sarsens and Bluebells

We often hear about Sarsen stones: they are the large standing stones and lintels forming the ring of giant stones at Stonehenge, they are the standing stones of Avebury, and they form the structure of many neolithic- and bronze-age barrows. They are scattered across the landscapes of the Salisbury Plain, the Wiltshire downs, and elsewhere, and are the remnants of a silica- cemented sandstone cap that once covered much of southern England. Why Sarsen? It is a shortening of Saracen, a common name for Muslims and commonly applied to anything non- Christian in the Wiltshire dialect. All this to say that we walked among natural sarsen stones lying in situ at the National Trust Conservation Area, Lockeridge Dene before heading off into the West Woods and a spectacular display of bluebells.
A Sense of Place:  Travel, Photography, and Photo-art
© David E. Moon, 2014  All rights reserved
Slideshow Slideshow