Snowshill Manor

English gentry are notorious for their follies (costly ornamental buildings of no discernible use), but the eccentric Charles Paget Wade, took a different direction. He purchased and restored a 15th - 17th century manor house and gardens, primarily to house and display the most wondrously eclectic collection of “stuff” from priceless antiques, to musical instruments, toys, and Japanese armour, anything in fact that he considered exemplars of craftsmanship. He lived in a “cozy” little house between the manor house and the garden, reserving the main house to display his collection. The manor house is a multiple-floor maze of organized disorder with objects displayed to please Wade’s visual aesthetic rather than any formal organizational or classification structure. The Priest’s House, where Wade lived, was spacious enough, but so jammed with “stuff” as to border on the claustrophobic. In contrast, the gardens were lovely and the minimally managed grounds a quiet escape to nature. To my surprise, the experience was fascinating and strangely compelling. It would take days, if not weeks, to explore the entire collection in detail.
A Sense of Place:  Travel, Photography, and Photo-art
by David E. Moon
© David E. Moon, 2018  All rights reserved
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Snowshill Manor

English gentry are notorious for their follies (costly ornamental buildings of no discernible use), but the eccentric Charles Paget Wade, took a different direction. He purchased and restored a 15th - 17th century manor house and gardens, primarily to house and display the most wondrously eclectic collection of “stuff” from priceless antiques, to musical instruments, toys, and Japanese armour, anything in fact that he considered exemplars of craftsmanship. He lived in a “cozy” little house between the manor house and the garden, reserving the main house to display his collection. The manor house is a multiple-floor maze of organized disorder with objects displayed to please Wade’s visual aesthetic rather than any formal organizational or classification structure. The Priest’s House, where Wade lived, was spacious enough, but so jammed with “stuff” as to border on the claustrophobic. In contrast, the gardens were lovely and the minimally managed grounds a quiet escape to nature. To my surprise, the experience was fascinating and strangely compelling. It would take days, if not weeks, to explore the entire collection in detail.
A Sense of Place:  Travel, Photography, and Photo-art
© David E. Moon, 2014  All rights reserved
Slideshow Slideshow