Norton St Philip, Wells, and the Holcombe Inn

We had visited Wells on an earlier trip, but it had been on our last day of a 3-month circumnavigation of Britain and Ireland, we were tired of living in a VW van, and it was raining, so we limited our exploration to the magnificent cathedral. Today was wonderful, sunny and warm, so we headed off from our cottage in Holt to visit the town. We were enjoying the gorgeous Somerset countryside when the 700-year-old George Inn in Norton St Philip waylaid us. Despite renovations through the centuries, it maintains much of its medieval character but successfully blends a mix of traditional pub with elegant dining and we enjoyed a morning coffee and cake in the pub. While Wells is best known for its magnificent cathedral, we chose to explore the streets and were pleasantly surprised to discover a working-class town in addition to the ecclesiastical buildings, tourist-centric high street, and affluent residences. We ended our day near at the 17th-century Holcombe Inn. We had discovered the inn on a previous trip when we had been directed to the church by a very courteous gentleman whose parking place we had usurped in Lower Vobster and then to the Inn by a sign on the door of the church for the key. Sheila was very taken with the inn and I promised that we would spend at least 1 night on our next trip. * Reduntant churches remain sanctified but no longer offer regular services and are in the care of the Churches Conservation Trust (see contents for a page on redundant churches). 
A Sense of Place:  Travel, Photography, and Photo-art
by David E. Moon
© David E. Moon, 2014  All rights reserved
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Norton St Philip, Wells, and the Holcombe Inn

We had visited Wells on an earlier trip, but it had been on our last day of a 3-month circumnavigation of Britain and Ireland, we were tired of living in a VW van, and it was raining, so we limited our exploration to the magnificent cathedral. Today was wonderful, sunny and warm, so we headed off from our cottage in Holt to visit the town. We were enjoying the gorgeous Somerset countryside when the 700-year-old George Inn in Norton St Philip waylaid us. Despite renovations through the centuries, it maintains much of its medieval character but successfully blends a mix of traditional pub with elegant dining and we enjoyed a morning coffee and cake in the pub. While Wells is best known for its magnificent cathedral, we chose to explore the streets and were pleasantly surprised to discover a working-class town in addition to the ecclesiastical buildings, tourist-centric high street, and affluent residences. We ended our day near at the 17th-century Holcombe Inn. We had discovered the inn on a previous trip when we had been directed to the church by a very courteous gentleman whose parking place we had usurped in Lower Vobster and then to the Inn by a sign on the door of the church for the key. Sheila was very taken with the inn and I promised that we would spend at least 1 night on our next trip. * Reduntant churches remain sanctified but no longer offer regular services and are in the care of the Churches Conservation Trust (see contents for a page on redundant churches). 
A Sense of Place:  Travel, Photography, and Photo-art
© David E. Moon, 2014  All rights reserved
Slideshow Slideshow