Wilton Windmill Walk and Hungerford

Walking is one of the simple life pleasures that I think I would miss the most. Whether it be exploring a city, a village, or the countryside, the quiet rhythm of walking soothes and opens the mind to the appreciation of its surroundings. The public footpath is one of England’s greatest treasures. It gives the public access to both public and private lands through fields and forests, private estates, towns, and villages. They are generally well marked (although some can be quite obscure), and with the exception of inquisitive steers and protective cows, quite safe. Quite wonderfully, they are also, with only a few exceptions, free of biting or blood-sucking insects. The web abounds with recommended walks in Britain but beware, some are better documented than others and instructions may become clear only after the fact. Carrying an ordinance survey map is a good idea. Even better, download the OSMap app (https://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/shop/os- maps-mobile.html) to your mobile phone. For a minimal monthly fee, you can load predefined walking routes to your mobile phone or define your own using their excellent on-line maps showing public foot and bridle paths. Once downloaded, make sure the GPS function on your phone is turned on, and you can find your current location on the defined route. Periodically check to see if you have strayed from your route or to resolve ambiguous directions and you can save yourself a lot of backtracking. This slide show follows one of the ad hoc walks we created on OSMap followed by a brief exploration of the town of Hungerford.
A Sense of Place:  Travel, Photography, and Photo-art
by David E. Moon
© David E. Moon, 2014  All rights reserved
Slideshow Slideshow

Wilton Windmill Walk and Hungerford

Walking is one of the simple life pleasures that I think I would miss the most. Whether it be exploring a city, a village, or the countryside, the quiet rhythm of walking soothes and opens the mind to the appreciation of its surroundings. The public footpath is one of England’s greatest treasures. It gives the public access to both public and private lands through fields and forests, private estates, towns, and villages. They are generally well marked (although some can be quite obscure), and with the exception of inquisitive steers and protective cows, quite safe. Quite wonderfully, they are also, with only a few exceptions, free of biting or blood-sucking insects. The web abounds with recommended walks in Britain but beware, some are better documented than others and instructions may become clear only after the fact. Carrying an ordinance survey map is a good idea. Even better, download the OSMap app (https://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/shop/os- maps-mobile.html) to your mobile phone. For a minimal monthly fee, you can load predefined walking routes to your mobile phone or define your own using their excellent on-line maps showing public foot and bridle paths. Once downloaded, make sure the GPS function on your phone is turned on, and you can find your current location on the defined route. Periodically check to see if you have strayed from your route or to resolve ambiguous directions and you can save yourself a lot of backtracking. This slide show follows one of the ad hoc walks we created on OSMap followed by a brief exploration of the town of Hungerford.
A Sense of Place:  Travel, Photography, and Photo-art
© David E. Moon, 2014  All rights reserved
Slideshow Slideshow