June 9, Our last day in Paris

Our last full day in Paris, we had been going pretty steadily for 13 days, most of the time on our feet and walking as much as 11 km, to say nothing of shuffling through markets, museums, and stores. We used the last of our bacon, eggs, and bread for breakfast, showered, and debated going out versus taking a recovery day. Common sense lost, and we headed off to explore the streets between Montmartre and the Tuileries Gardens. Emerging from the Metro at Boulevard Montmartre and Boulevard Poissionniere, we were confronted with a long queue waiting to get into Musée Grevin, Cabinet Fantastique Palais des Mirages. They were blocking access to Passage Jouffroy, one of Paris’ renowned, 19th century, glass-covered shopping arcades. Passage Jouffroy was being renovated so we explored Passage des Panoramas across the street. Being Sunday, only a few restaurants were open and most of the shops ranging from art galleries, to philatelists, to fashion were closed for the Sabbath. It was nearly deserted, a little forlorn, and although intriguing, it would have been much more engaging with open shops and people shopping. Sheila had read about a highly recommended sandwich shop where we hoped to have lunch. As we headed up Rue du Fauberg-Montmartre, she realized that it was closed on Sundays. We settled for adequate crepes at Delicieux Montmartre, only later to discover some great looking places just up the street. Along Rue Cadet, shops and restaurants spilled onto the sidewalks, giving the street the air of an impromptu street market. We wound our way towards the Palais Garnier, home of the national Opera, passing offices of the fabled right-wing le Monde newspaper, and stopped to explore Galleries Lafayette with its truly opulent and impressive dome. From there we wandered down to the imposing Palais Garnier, but were not in the mood stand in line and pay 28 € to see the lobby and concert hall. We did however enjoy the parade of tourists taking selfies and group photos in front of the building. We dropped our gear at the apartment, and went off, wonderfully unencumbered by packs or cameras, for a last pastry and coffee at patisserie Miss-Manon on Boulevard Saint Antoine. Back at the apartment, we cobbled together a dinner from remnants in the fridge, packed, and cleaned before leaving early in the morning.
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© David E. Moon, 2019 All rights reserved

June 9, Our last day in Paris

Our last full day in Paris, we had been going pretty steadily for 13 days, most of the time on our feet and walking as much as 11 km, to say nothing of shuffling through markets, museums, and stores. We used the last of our bacon, eggs, and bread for breakfast, showered, and debated going out versus taking a recovery day. Common sense lost, and we headed off to explore the streets between Montmartre and the Tuileries Gardens. Emerging from the Metro at Boulevard Montmartre and Boulevard Poissionniere, we were confronted with a long queue waiting to get into Musée Grevin, Cabinet Fantastique Palais des Mirages. They were blocking access to Passage Jouffroy, one of Paris’ renowned, 19th century, glass-covered shopping arcades. Passage Jouffroy was being renovated so we explored Passage des Panoramas across the street. Being Sunday, only a few restaurants were open and most of the shops ranging from art galleries, to philatelists, to fashion were closed for the Sabbath. It was nearly deserted, a little forlorn, and although intriguing, it would have been much more engaging with open shops and people shopping. Sheila had read about a highly recommended sandwich shop where we hoped to have lunch. As we headed up Rue du Fauberg-Montmartre, she realized that it was closed on Sundays. We settled for adequate crepes at Delicieux Montmartre, only later to discover some great looking places just up the street. Along Rue Cadet, shops and restaurants spilled onto the sidewalks, giving the street the air of an impromptu street market. We wound our way towards the Palais Garnier, home of the national Opera, passing offices of the fabled right-wing le Monde newspaper, and stopped to explore Galleries Lafayette with its truly opulent and impressive dome. From there we wandered down to the imposing Palais Garnier, but were not in the mood stand in line and pay 28 € to see the lobby and concert hall. We did however enjoy the parade of tourists taking selfies and group photos in front of the building. We dropped our gear at the apartment, and went off, wonderfully unencumbered by packs or cameras, for a last pastry and coffee at patisserie Miss-Manon on Boulevard Saint Antoine. Back at the apartment, we cobbled together a dinner from remnants in the fridge, packed, and cleaned before leaving early in the morning.
Tap/Click to begin slide show
© David E. Moon, 2014 All rights reserved