June 16, Canals, Textiles, and Windmills

The weather forecast looked wonderful, partly cloudy skies, minimal chance of rain, and temperatures in the low 20s. Hah! Good thing we took our raincoats. We began strolling the perimeter canal, originally a moat surrounding the city, before mistakenly crossing into the old city. We realized our mistake and had returned to the canal at Zijipoort (an old city gate and wall) when it began to rain. We went looking for coffee, but it was Sunday morning and virtually nothing was open. We finally found coffee and pastries, sheltered under their awning, used their toilets, and set off again under light rain. We lost interest in the perimeter canal and explored the streets and canals of the old city instead. We picnicked at a table on the plaza, but just as we were finishing our meal, one of the restauranteurs politely informed us that we were not allowed to sit there, even if he was closed. A small Weavers and Textile museum, was housed in a 16 th century house furnished as a 19th century weaver would have lived. A very pleasant lady gave us a demonstration on a 400 year old loom and some historical background on weaving in Holland before pointing us to an exhibition of modern art weaving on display in the rest of the house. It was an interesting counterpoint to the traditional 16 th century building and 19 th century furnishings, but the exposed roof tiles and beam construction of the attic was even more interesting than the art display. As we left the textile museum, the sun had returned, drawing people into the streets and onto the canals where pleasure boats full of families and friends were out for a picnic and boat ride. The many floors of the Molenmuseum (windmill museum) “De Valk” had a one-way route of extremely precipitous, narrow wood ladder/stairs guiding us through the millers home and the various functions and mechanisms of the mill. We tend not to realize just how important the mills were to the population, and they were often the first casualties of war. It was a fascinating visit and well worth both the entrance fee and the energy expended on the ladders. We purchased a windmill Christmas ornament before wandering off to explore the streets and look for the only other surviving mill. Returning around 5:30, we had a glass of wine, some bread and cheese, and headed off for a dinner of fish and chips on the Einstein Restaurant’s canal side barge.
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© David E. Moon, 2019 All rights reserved

June 16, Canals, Textiles, and Windmills

The weather forecast looked wonderful, partly cloudy skies, minimal chance of rain, and temperatures in the low 20s. Hah! Good thing we took our raincoats. We began strolling the perimeter canal, originally a moat surrounding the city, before mistakenly crossing into the old city. We realized our mistake and had returned to the canal at Zijipoort (an old city gate and wall) when it began to rain. We went looking for coffee, but it was Sunday morning and virtually nothing was open. We finally found coffee and pastries, sheltered under their awning, used their toilets, and set off again under light rain. We lost interest in the perimeter canal and explored the streets and canals of the old city instead. We picnicked at a table on the plaza, but just as we were finishing our meal, one of the restauranteurs politely informed us that we were not allowed to sit there, even if he was closed. A small Weavers and Textile museum, was housed in a 16 th century house furnished as a 19th century weaver would have lived. A very pleasant lady gave us a demonstration on a 400 year old loom and some historical background on weaving in Holland before pointing us to an exhibition of modern art weaving on display in the rest of the house. It was an interesting counterpoint to the traditional 16 th century building and 19 th century furnishings, but the exposed roof tiles and beam construction of the attic was even more interesting than the art display. As we left the textile museum, the sun had returned, drawing people into the streets and onto the canals where pleasure boats full of families and friends were out for a picnic and boat ride. The many floors of the Molenmuseum (windmill museum) “De Valk” had a one-way route of extremely precipitous, narrow wood ladder/stairs guiding us through the millers home and the various functions and mechanisms of the mill. We tend not to realize just how important the mills were to the population, and they were often the first casualties of war. It was a fascinating visit and well worth both the entrance fee and the energy expended on the ladders. We purchased a windmill Christmas ornament before wandering off to explore the streets and look for the only other surviving mill. Returning around 5:30, we had a glass of wine, some bread and cheese, and headed off for a dinner of fish and chips on the Einstein Restaurant’s canal side barge.
Tap/Click to begin slide show
© David E. Moon, 2014 All rights reserved