May 28, Coulée Verte René-Dumont - Evening along the Seine

After breakfast, we walked to the Hôtel de Ville (city hall), passing two of the few medieval buildings remaining in Paris. At l’Office du Tourisme, a pleasant young lady tried to convince us to buy a combined transit/museum pass to major museums in Paris. A little analysis convinced us that to make it cost effective, we would have to visit too many museums in too short a time to do them justice, and so demurred. Nearby, the imposing Tour Saint-Jacques, all that remains of the former 16t h -century Church of Saint-Jacques-de-la-Boucherie ("Saint James of the butchers") demolished during the French Revolution towered above the streets. We stopped Au Petit Versailles du Marais for a shared lunch, a merely adequate quiche (sun-dried tomato, feta, fresh tomato, and greens, but followed by excellent coffee and an exceptional apple tart, delivered by a profoundly unengaged waiter and with a painful $40 bill. We headed back to the apartment for another rest and had a home cooked dinner of pasta, tomato sauce, veg, and fresh bread before heading off to explore the 4.7 km la Coulée Verte Rene-Dumont (Promenade plantée), an elevated linear park built on an old rail-line. It was a pleasant, if uninspiring walk, interesting mostly because of the elevated perspective on the streets below. Returning to the river, streetlights flickered to life and the sidewalk cafe and restaurant tables filled as daylight faded. Come evening, Parisiennes use the Seine, its banks are alive with people, some strolling, groups socializing, al fresco dining and dancing, beautiful sculpture gardens with riverside amphitheatres and terraces, even ad hoc performances and amateur ballroom dancing. Buildings, bridges, and monuments glowed in the night and the City of Light became just a little more romantic as we walked back to the apartment.
Tap/Click to begin slide show
© David E. Moon, 2019 All rights reserved

May 28, Coulée Verte René-Dumont - Evening

along the Seine

After breakfast, we walked to the Hôtel de Ville (city hall), passing two of the few medieval buildings remaining in Paris. At l’Office du Tourisme, a pleasant young lady tried to convince us to buy a combined transit/museum pass to major museums in Paris. A little analysis convinced us that to make it cost effective, we would have to visit too many museums in too short a time to do them justice, and so demurred. Nearby, the imposing Tour Saint-Jacques, all that remains of the former 16t h -century Church of Saint- Jacques-de-la-Boucherie ("Saint James of the butchers") demolished during the French Revolution towered above the streets. We stopped Au Petit Versailles du Marais for a shared lunch, a merely adequate quiche (sun- dried tomato, feta, fresh tomato, and greens, but followed by excellent coffee and an exceptional apple tart, delivered by a profoundly unengaged waiter and with a painful $40 bill. We headed back to the apartment for another rest and had a home cooked dinner of pasta, tomato sauce, veg, and fresh bread before heading off to explore the 4.7 km la Coulée Verte Rene-Dumont (Promenade plantée), an elevated linear park built on an old rail-line. It was a pleasant, if uninspiring walk, interesting mostly because of the elevated perspective on the streets below. Returning to the river, streetlights flickered to life and the sidewalk cafe and restaurant tables filled as daylight faded. Come evening, Parisiennes use the Seine, its banks are alive with people, some strolling, groups socializing, al fresco dining and dancing, beautiful sculpture gardens with riverside amphitheatres and terraces, even ad hoc performances and amateur ballroom dancing. Buildings, bridges, and monuments glowed in the night and the City of Light became just a little more romantic as we walked back to the apartment.
Tap/Click to begin slide show
© David E. Moon, 2014 All rights reserved