May 30, Market Day

Already, as I write this on the 31st, the days are beginning to run together. We broke our fast at Bistrot d’Antoine with a French breakfast: Orange juice, baguette, croissant, and coffee with confiture 18 € ($27 Cad) with tip before heading off to explore the Marché de la Bastille, a most engaging outdoor market. We arrived relatively early as some vendors were still setting up, but the cacophony of meats, fish, fruits, vegetables, pastries, cheeses, hats, shoes, belts, purses, eastern carpets, , ethnic art, jewelry, personal hygiene products, etc., etc. was quite amazing. The vendors were friendly, helpful, and happily responded in English to queries in French. As I photographed, vendors would ask me to take pictures of their produce or pose themselves. As the morning progressed the crowds built to the point where photography became difficult. Sheila purchased a miniature Eiffel tower for our Christmas tree, a shopping bag, and a couple of ornamental boxes as gifts and we stocked up on andouille sausage, olives, tapenade, garlic, ham in parsley aspic, and finally a couple of kouign-amann for dessert. We returned to the apartment where Sheila prepared a photograph worthy arrangement of our morning purchases for lunch and we then took a nap before heading off to explore le Marché des Enfants Rouge, known for its diversity of prepared ethnic foods. We were a little early for dinner, so we continued our explorations, enjoyed an ice-cream while sitting on a bench in the Square to Temple (a lovely little park off the Rue de Bretagne) before heading up to Place de la Republique with its massive monument, topped by a statue of Marianne (the personification of the Republic since the revolution). We took a rather long, somewhat misguided route back to the Marché des Enfantes Rouge for dinner, missing out on the Passage du Caire (covered passages) because we left our Michelin guide behind. Our Moroccan dishes (the daily plat and a merguez with ratatouille, cous cous, and roti like bread) was delicious but not cheap, an eye watering 27.8 € ($41 Cad) and our beverage was a small can of Coke. We hastened our return to the apartment as Sheila feared the onset of intestinal problems. Fortunately it was a false alarm and we were able to enjoy our kouign-amanns with coffee for dessert.
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© David E. Moon, 2019 All rights reserved

May 30, Market Day

Already, as I write this on the 31st, the days are beginning to run together. We broke our fast at Bistrot d’Antoine with a French breakfast: Orange juice, baguette, croissant, and coffee with confiture 18 € ($27 Cad) with tip before heading off to explore the Marché de la Bastille, a most engaging outdoor market. We arrived relatively early as some vendors were still setting up, but the cacophony of meats, fish, fruits, vegetables, pastries, cheeses, hats, shoes, belts, purses, eastern carpets, , ethnic art, jewelry, personal hygiene products, etc., etc. was quite amazing. The vendors were friendly, helpful, and happily responded in English to queries in French. As I photographed, vendors would ask me to take pictures of their produce or pose themselves. As the morning progressed the crowds built to the point where photography became difficult. Sheila purchased a miniature Eiffel tower for our Christmas tree, a shopping bag, and a couple of ornamental boxes as gifts and we stocked up on andouille sausage, olives, tapenade, garlic, ham in parsley aspic, and finally a couple of kouign-amann for dessert. We returned to the apartment where Sheila prepared a photograph worthy arrangement of our morning purchases for lunch and we then took a nap before heading off to explore le Marché des Enfants Rouge, known for its diversity of prepared ethnic foods. We were a little early for dinner, so we continued our explorations, enjoyed an ice-cream while sitting on a bench in the Square to Temple (a lovely little park off the Rue de Bretagne) before heading up to Place de la Republique with its massive monument, topped by a statue of Marianne (the personification of the Republic since the revolution). We took a rather long, somewhat misguided route back to the Marché des Enfantes Rouge for dinner, missing out on the Passage du Caire (covered passages) because we left our Michelin guide behind. Our Moroccan dishes (the daily plat and a merguez with ratatouille, cous cous, and roti like bread) was delicious but not cheap, an eye watering 27.8 € ($41 Cad) and our beverage was a small can of Coke. We hastened our return to the apartment as Sheila feared the onset of intestinal problems. Fortunately it was a false alarm and we were able to enjoy our kouign-amanns with coffee for dessert.
Tap/Click to begin slide show
© David E. Moon, 2014 All rights reserved