© David E. Moon, 2019 All rights reserved
Sant Mary's Cathedral, Tortosa, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain
Paris
Paris City of light, city of love, once the centre of European art, culture, fashion, philosophy, finance, and gastronomy. A city of museums, cafe culture, designer boutiques, broad boulevards, parks, monuments, and the River Seine. For a city that is millennia old and that has never been destroyed by catastrophe or war, surprisingly little of medieval or ancient Paris remains and it shows a remarkable order and harmony of architecture. This is largely the result of Napoleon III and Baron Haussmann the Prefect of the Seine. Between 1853 and 1870 they rebuilt the city centre with wide boulevards radiating from squares often centred with statues, monuments, or fountains. They required standard façades built of cream coloured “Paris Stone” and created major public parks throughout the city. Strict urban planning laws in effect since the early 17th century have avoided rampant, uncoordinated development, but Haussmann’s redevelopment has given central Paris a distinctive, elegant, monotony. The somewhat monotonous architecture of the boulevards and streets was offset by a stunningly cosmopolitan society and a cafe/restaurant culture spilling onto the sidewalks of virtually every neighbourhood we explored, and while the architectural character of the streets is little changed, tourism has dramatically changed the shops and society of many famous districts. Paris is also a city of markets, from modern, almost antiseptic indoor markets, and intimate, traditional weekly neighbourhood markets, to vast outdoor markets selling almost anything you can imagine. The local boulangerie (baker), pâtisserie (pastry), boucherie (butcher), épicerie (grocer), charcuterie (prepared meats), fromagerie (cheese monger) are alive and well, not yet replaced by the super marché and I looked forward to my morning walk to the boulangerie for our breakfast baguette and croissants. Two weeks was only enough to scratch the surface of this amazing city and the treasure of its museums alone could have occupied us for a month.
Tap/Click to enter 2019
Sant Mary's Cathedral, Tortosa, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain
Paris City of light, city of love, once the centre of European art, culture, fashion, philosophy, finance, and gastronomy. A city of museums, cafe culture, designer boutiques, broad boulevards, parks, monuments, and the River Seine. For a city that is millennia old and that has never been destroyed by catastrophe or war, surprisingly little of medieval or ancient Paris remains and it shows a remarkable order and harmony of architecture. This is largely the result of Napoleon III and Baron Haussmann the Prefect of the Seine. Between 1853 and 1870 they rebuilt the city centre with wide boulevards radiating from squares often centred with statues, monuments, or fountains. They required standard façades built of cream coloured “Paris Stone” and created major public parks throughout the city. Strict urban planning laws in effect since the early 17th century have avoided rampant, uncoordinated development, but Haussmann’s redevelopment has given central Paris a distinctive, elegant, monotony. The somewhat monotonous architecture of the boulevards and streets was offset by a stunningly cosmopolitan society and a cafe/restaurant culture spilling onto the sidewalks of virtually every neighbourhood we explored, and while the architectural character of the streets is little changed, tourism has dramatically changed the shops and society of many famous districts. Paris is also a city of markets, from modern, almost antiseptic indoor markets, and intimate, traditional weekly neighbourhood markets, to vast outdoor markets selling almost anything you can imagine. The local boulangerie (baker), pâtisserie (pastry), boucherie (butcher), épicerie (grocer), charcuterie (prepared meats), fromagerie (cheese monger) are alive and well, not yet replaced by the super marché and I looked forward to my morning walk to the boulangerie for our breakfast baguette and croissants. Two weeks was only enough to scratch the surface of this amazing city and the treasure of its museums alone could have occupied us for a month.
Tap/Click to enter Paris,  2019
© David E. Moon, 2014 All rights reserved