June 10, Île de Bréhat

One of the many islands strewn along the Brittany coast, Île de Bréhat is a 10-minute boat ride from Pointe de l’Arcouest. Île de Bréhat is actually a small archipelago whose two main islands are connected only at low tide and joined at high by a foot bridge. Two small foot passenger ferries were moored at the quay. Our sister ferry docked about 10 minutes after departure, we sailed on by the harbour. I finally asked a lovely lady from Paris if she knew why we had not landed and learned that we had mistakenly purchased tickets for the tour around the island. Sometimes referred to as an island paradise or the island of flowers, Île de Bréhat is indeed lovely and its beauty is enhanced by the lack of cars. Narrow lanes carry pedestrians, bicycles, and tractors around the island connecting stunning mansions with beautifully manicured estates to small cottages with equally beautiful backyard gardens. Footpaths and lanes connecting small inlets and coves, leading past cultivated fields, pasture, and cottages, under the radiant warmth of the sun and a cool breeze created the perfect leisurely stroll and exploration. A pleasant climb to the small Chapelle Saint-Michel brought views across fields, wealthy estates, and cottages to coves sheltering pleasure boats riding at anchor or sitting on the mudflat. We stopped at the quaint Crêperie Les Blé Noirs for lunch. The proprietress, her staff having booked off sick, was on her own. Cooking, waiting table, and handling the cash for a nearly full house, she had every right to be harried but was friendly, courteous, and patient. She managed not only to cope, but served some very tasty lunch crêpes (carmelized apple and camembert and andouille with potato, lardon, raclette, and onion). Our only quibble was that of the $33 bill, $9 was for two Cokes (we should have had wine). While waiting for the ferry after a truly pleasant day, we were having a beer at the touristy Place de Bourg, country music blaring from the bar, I commented that soon they would have a tractor pulling a tourist train and low and behold, one appeared with an American family in the carriage. We had parked in a public lot and had noticed toilets and numerous camper-vans when we had arrived. Thinking to spend the night, we went to inspect the toilets and found them locked but the area around them well-used for the same purpose.  We decided against free camping and headed off to a lovely commercial site; quiet, by the water, almost empty. Our pitch on a well-kept, garden-like terrace with hedges separating pitches felt like camping in a formal garden above the beach.
A Sense of Place:  Travel, Photography, and Photo-art
by David E. Moon
© David E. Moon, 2014  All rights reserved
Slideshow Slideshow Route Map Route Map
View across the Tarn from camp. View across the Tarn from camp. View across the Tarn from camp. View across the Tarn from camp.

June 10, Île de Bréhat

One of the many islands strewn along the Brittany coast, Île de Bréhat is a 10-minute boat ride from Pointe de l’Arcouest. Île de Bréhat is actually a small archipelago whose two main islands are con- nected only at low tide and joined at high by a foot bridge. Two small foot passenger ferries were moored at the quay. Our sister ferry docked about 10 minutes after departure, we sailed on by the harbour. I finally asked a lovely lady from Paris if she knew why we had not landed and learned that we had mistakenly purchased tickets for the tour around the island. Sometimes referred to as an island paradise or the island of flowers, Île de Bréhat is indeed lovely and its beauty is enhanced by the lack of cars. Narrow lanes carry pedestrians, bicycles, and tractors around the island connecting stun- ning mansions with beautifully manicured estates to small cottages with equally beautiful backyard gar- dens. Footpaths and lanes con- necting small inlets and coves, leading past cul- tivated fields, pasture, and cottages, under the radiant warmth of the sun and a cool breeze created the perfect leisurely stroll and exploration. A pleasant climb to the small Chapelle Saint- Michel brought views across fields, wealthy estates, and cottages to coves sheltering pleas- ure boats riding at anchor or sitting on the mudflat. We stopped at the quaint Crêperie Les Blé Noirs for lunch. The proprietress, her staff having booked off sick, was on her own. Cook- ing, waiting table, and handling the cash for a nearly full house, she had every right to be harried but was friendly, courteous, and patient. She managed not only to cope, but served some very tasty lunch crêpes (carmel- ized apple and camembert and andouille with potato, lardon, raclette, and onion). Our only quibble was that of the $33 bill, $9 was for two Cokes (we should have had wine). While waiting for the ferry after a truly pleas- ant day, we were having a beer at the touristy Place de Bourg, country music blaring from the bar, I commented that soon they would have a tractor pulling a tourist train and low and behold, one appeared with an American family in the carriage. We had parked in a public lot and had noticed toilets and numerous camper-vans when we had arrived. Thinking to spend the night, we went to inspect the toilets and found them locked but the area around them well-used for the same purpose.  We decided against free camping and headed off to a lovely commercial site; quiet, by the water, almost empty. Our pitch on a well-kept, garden-like terrace with hedges separating pitches felt like camping in a formal garden above the beach.
A Sense of Place:  Travel, Photography, and Photo-art
© David E. Moon, 2014  All rights reserved
Route Map Route Map Slideshow Slideshow
View across the Tarn from camp. View across the Tarn from camp. View across the Tarn from camp. View across the Tarn from camp.