South Oregon Coast: After a long period of wind and rain, we woke to glorious early March sunshine . It totally transformed the mood of the coast and we retraced our route north to visit the sand dunes east of Lakeside,  before returning  to a shel- tered cove near our camp for lunch. Continuing south, we diverted up the Rogue River in search of Oregon’s largest known Myrtle tree before returning to the coast.
Sunset Bay on our route back north to visit the complex of sand dunes west of Lakeside proved so inviting that we returned for lunch after exploring the dunes. Unspoiled by the sound and tracks of dune buggies or ATVs, the graceful mosaic of barren longitudinal dunes, small ponds, tree islands, and pockets of dune grass were soothing and peaceful. Onshore winds sculpt and shape the sand around pockets of dune grass and small birds and animals leave their ephemeral tracks on the ever changing pallet of sand. Sea mists lightly shroud Lookout Rock south of Humbug Mountain State Park while gulls ride the updrafts from on-shore winds rising over the bluffs. It is easy to find a beach all to yourself or yourself and your dogs along the Oregon Coast Highway. One of the original 8 rivers named in Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1968, the Rogue River had expended its fury by the time it reached the coast, and a side trip up the Rogue was a pleasant, if unspectacular, change from the coastal vista. A view from the bridge crossing Lobster Creek (tributary to the Rogue) made us feel like we were back home on the southeast coast of Vancouver Island. Not as impressive as the giant redwood or western red cedar, this largest known Myrtlewood in Oregon was a pretty impressive Laurel. Back on the coast at Meyer’s Beach, another weather front was moving in to threaten our brief respite from rain and wind. Contents
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Anecdote Anecdote Location Location
South Oregon Coast: After a long period of wind and rain, we woke to glorious early March sunshine . It totally transformed the mood of the coast and we retraced our route north to visit the sand dunes east of Lakeside,  before return- ing  to a sheltered cove near our camp for lunch. Continuing south, we diverted up the Rogue River in search of Ore- gon’s largest known Myr- tle tree before returning to the coast.
Sunset Bay on our route back north to visit the complex of sand dunes west of Lakeside proved so inviting that we returned for lunch after exploring the dunes. Unspoiled by the sound and tracks of dune buggies or ATVs, the graceful mosaic of barren longitudinal dunes, small ponds, tree islands, and pockets of dune grass were soothing and peaceful. Onshore winds sculpt and shape the sand around pockets of dune grass and small birds and animals leave their ephemeral tracks on the ever changing pallet of sand. Sea mists lightly shroud Lookout Rock south of Humbug Mountain State Park while gulls ride the updrafts from on-shore winds rising over the bluffs. It is easy to find a beach all to yourself or yourself and your dogs along the Oregon Coast Highway. One of the original 8 rivers named in Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1968, the Rogue River had expended its fury by the time it reached the coast, and a side trip up the Rogue was a pleasant, if unspectacular, change from the coastal vista. A view from the bridge crossing Lobster Creek (tributary to the Rogue) made us feel like we were back home on the southeast coast of Vancouver Island. Not as impressive as the giant redwood or western red cedar, this largest known Myrtlewood in Oregon was a pretty impressive Laurel. Back on the coast at Meyer’s Beach, another weather front was moving in to threaten our brief respite from rain and wind.
Click/tap any image to show slides and captions
Anecdote Anecdote Location Location Contents