Great  Witley Walk in the Malvern Hills The public footpath network is truly one of Britain’s national treasures. We plotted a 10 km walk in the Malvern Hills district near Great Witley that would take us to the remains of an iron age hill fort, through forest hills and pastures to the Abberley Hall prep school, and back into the forested hills before returning to our start point. Armed with the route plotted on the Ordinance Survey map stored on our cell phone GPS, we set off under mixed cloud, sun, and cold winds, across spring wheat fields and easily found our way along a narrow country lane before climbing into the hills and forest to the remains of the old hill fort. Weathered and faded interpretive signs confirmed that we had found the fort, but we could find no remains and the signs were so weathered as to be near illegible. Despite our GPS and colour coded path markers, we managed to find ourselves unsure if we were on the public footpath or private property as we crossed below the terraced lawns of a large mansion, but the owners were more concerned that their dogs might follow us than about our presence on their land. After a steep descent, and a steep climb, lunch in a pasture looking down on Great Witley. We encountered a crew brushing out our route in preparation for the Malvern Hills Charity Walk sponsored by St Richards Hospice. Having worked up a bit of a sweat during the climb, we were lucky to have a sunny break at lunch or despite our jackets, we would have been a little cold and uncomfortable. After lunch our route along the ridge took us past lovely views of sheep and dairy pastures, the Malvern Hills, and the halls and clock tower of the Abberley Hall prep school. Descending to the valley bottom, we followed the public footpath through the grounds of Abberley Hall, but when the path entered an uninteresting managed woodlot and the weather began to deteriorate, we aborted the route at about 6.5 km and returned to our car.
A Sense of Place:  Travel, Photography, and Photo-art
by David E. Moon
© David E. Moon, 2018  All rights reserved
Slideshow Slideshow
Great  Witley Walk in the Malvern Hills The public footpath network is truly one of Britain’s national treasures. We plotted a 10 km walk in the Malvern Hills district near Great Witley that would take us to the remains of an iron age hill fort, through forest hills and pastures to the Abberley Hall prep school, and back into the forested hills before returning to our start point. Armed with the route plotted on the Ordinance Survey map stored on our cell phone GPS, we set off under mixed cloud, sun, and cold winds, across spring wheat fields and easily found our way along a narrow country lane before climbing into the hills and forest to the remains of the old hill fort. Weathered and faded interpretive signs confirmed that we had found the fort, but we could find no remains and the signs were so weathered as to be near illegible. Despite our GPS and colour coded path markers, we managed to find ourselves unsure if we were on the public footpath or private property as we crossed below the terraced lawns of a large mansion, but the owners were more concerned that their dogs might follow us than about our presence on their land. After a steep descent, and a steep climb, lunch in a pasture looking down on Great Witley. We encountered a crew brushing out our route in preparation for the Malvern Hills Charity Walk sponsored by St Richards Hospice. Having worked up a bit of a sweat during the climb, we were lucky to have a sunny break at lunch or despite our jackets, we would have been a little cold and uncomfortable. After lunch our route along the ridge took us past lovely views of sheep and dairy pastures, the Malvern Hills, and the halls and clock tower of the Abberley Hall prep school. Descending to the valley bottom, we followed the public footpath through the grounds of Abberley Hall, but when the path entered an uninteresting managed woodlot and the weather began to deteriorate, we aborted the route at about 6.5 km and returned to our car.
A Sense of Place:  Travel, Photography, and Photo-art
© David E. Moon, 2014  All rights reserved
Slideshow Slideshow